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Addressing Racial Equity in our Adult Education Classrooms, Programs, and the Field - Shared screen with speaker view
Gina Pandolfo
27:18
Paulo Freire
Kirsten Collins
27:20
Bell Hooks
grayla reneau
27:22
Frederick Douglass
Kimberly Libby
27:24
Ella Baker
Elizabeth Studstill
27:24
I'm inspired by bell hooks :)
Jayme Adelson-Goldstein
27:26
Elsa Auerbach
Andy Nash
27:27
Lisa Delpit
Esther Mayer
27:28
My mother
Kirsten Collins
27:29
*bell hooks :)
Silja Kallenbach
27:30
Paolo Freire
Mark Trushkowsky
27:48
Septima Clark and Myles Horton are huge heroes of adult education for me.
Edie Lantz Leppert
28:02
Victoria Purcell-Gates
Mark Trushkowsky
28:09
Yes, to bell hooks!
Jessica Levy
28:22
Niyonu Spann
Stacie Evans
28:27
Mildred Alice Brooks, my aunt, who began teaching before Jim Crow in the South.
Gwen Moore
28:34
yes to Freire!
Mark Trushkowsky
29:11
Stacie, I’d lovely to hear her story.
Virginia Dugan
29:31
My family
Stacie Evans
30:26
@Mark :)
Maegan Morris
31:08
That is Cynthia's chat box
Janet Isserlis
33:02
also, Stacie, yes, please
Elke Stappert
36:22
Fascinating!
Beverly Keim
37:24
That is one of the most helpful presentations I've seen about how implicit bias works in/on our brain
Krystina Janus
38:04
There's a gray square that is obscuring a portion of your presentation.
Krystina Janus
38:17
Ah! now it's gone!
Elizabeth Studstill
38:32
It's her view of the Zoom chat, don't worry about it :)
Elke Stappert
40:07
Older teachers might be expected to know less about computers
Elizabeth Studstill
40:13
there's always been a difference in how teachers react to my sister and I. we're mixed-race and she "looks" more Black than me.
Stacie Evans
40:24
Being a participant in a small presentation and the presenter only interacted with me when he talked about services for single mothers and people without HS or college credentials.
Kimberly Ellerthorpe
40:29
Any time a teacher decides in advance who the "good kids" and "bad kids" are.
Sally Waldron
40:38
I assumed that a male math student, with strong English language skills, would be among the stronger math students.
Shana Friend
40:43
Assuming the quiet student doesn't want/need help
Beverly Keim
40:54
Someone who says, "I need a couple of men to help with this job" - because the helpers simply have to be strong
Gina Pandolfo
41:03
When a Participants of Color come into the office, sometimes staff accidentally automatically assume they are English Language Learning participants
Edie Lantz Leppert
41:05
Trying to buy a car but the salesperson only spoke to my boyfriend (at the time)
Heather Patterson
41:08
I was at an airline event and the lady beside me said she worked at the airline so I asked if she was a flight attendant: she was a pilot.
Alice-Ann Beachy
41:10
A Chinese speaking student had very low literacy which surprised many teachers at my school
Philip Anderson
41:14
When on an interview committee, I was an outlier with a candidate who was Hispanic. I lived almost 2 decades in the Caribbean.
Natalie Jones
41:21
I work with Tribal TANF and so when I tell people I help needy Native American families I've been told, "oh are there Indians in this area? I thought they all lived in the mountains"
Virginia Dugan
41:40
Watching how people react to my cousin who is mixed race, or to other family members of different races and cultures
Stacie Evans
41:57
(Sorry, folks don't all know me, of course, so I should say that I'm a Black woman.) :)
Philip Anderson
42:42
Two students came to enroll in ESOL. I assumed the younger one knew more English.
Heidi Schuler-Jones
42:55
So many times when people are telling me about going to the doctor and my mind is picturing a man, and I laugh at myself when the person tells me it's a woman.
Kathryn Long
44:17
@ Stacie: Interestingly, I assumed that you are a Black woman based on what you described. And that points to what I've been taught - and how my biases are revealed.
Stacie Evans
45:29
@Kathryn -- It does point to that, but I'll be honest and say that it pleases me that I come across as Black just from typing! :)
Silja Kallenbach
46:24
That's also true of women and girls going into science fields
Michelle Brzezowski
46:33
I am just joining and only have a few minutes, will this be recorded and shared later?
Silja Kallenbach
46:51
yes
Jayme Adelson-Goldstein
49:28
Check ins with colleagues
Janet Isserlis
49:35
I try to notice when I’m making an assumption, and work to understand why and then how to change that
Heather Patterson
49:42
I try to think about being "anti-racist" instead of just "not being racist"
Elizabeth Studstill
50:08
working on a team where we're learning to be comfortable checking each other
Sally Waldron
50:08
I have a small voice that says, oh, you're doing that again. That helps me to stop.
Mark Trushkowsky
50:08
This metaphor resonates with me because I think combating implicit bias is a forever thing, it’s not like one day I’ve flipped the switch and can stop being vigilant.
Kathryn Long
50:35
I first say, "Thank you" when I get feedback from my students. It gives me time to not try to justify what I'm doing. I need to hear from them.
Jayme Adelson-Goldstein
50:52
Ask not tell
Philip Anderson
50:55
Tell myself before meetings to wait and be silent for a longer time than I usually do after someone speaks before I speak.
Virginia Dugan
51:28
Understanding that we need to continue to check in and evaluate
Elke Stappert
52:31
Anonymous Google Form surveys might be good to give students
Silja Kallenbach
52:50
Learning how to give constructive feedback is a skill in itself
Janet Isserlis
53:27
materials are the shells and flotsam and jetsam in the water where we swim.
Beverly Keim
53:42
Biased materials will have that effect on our students--of making them lose confidence
Alexandra Babbist
53:49
Because it can really shut a person down when they are excluded from the story being told by the materials making it impossible to participate actively
Debra Solomon
53:50
layers of bias... our own, that of our materials, what we've always done etc.
Mark Trushkowsky
53:54
Because education is a by product of trust and being and feeling safe
Kimberly Ellerthorpe
54:00
It's too easy otherwise to reinforce bias and other our learners.
Jessica Levy
54:14
I use photos in my slideshows, and just realized I need to search for photos with people wearing hijabs- because many of my students do. What am I reflecting to them if they don’t see themselves in the photos I use?
Debra Solomon
54:21
We teach the way we were taught unless we work hard to do something different
Xavier Munoz
54:36
Textbook publishers bring their own biases. And they may be far less likely to include perspectives and voices of those from marginalized communities (e.g., LGBTQ+)
Jessica Handrik
54:37
this is especially impactful on a standardized test
Andy Nash
54:52
To challenge the normalization of one (white, middle-class) perspective.
grayla reneau
55:19
The materials we use inform us and imply the views of the author (s).
Silja Kallenbach
55:27
And textbook publishers tend to make their decisions based on the most populous states' purchasing decisions and politics
Kathryn Long
56:20
I remember teaching with a book of stories, and the undocumented person in one story was Latinx. I came to see how problematic that was.
Beverly Keim
56:28
Assuming that immigrants always work for low wages
Jenny Duquette Norcott
56:32
These both imply that they are not valueable
Mark Trushkowsky
56:33
That immigrants work low paying jobs.
Susan Caisse
56:35
That immigrants have low wage jobs.
Kimberly Libby
56:36
They both assume that all immigrants are the same
Shana Friend
56:37
immigrants are low skilled
Sally Waldron
56:42
Immigrants do low-skilled jobs.
keri marion
56:43
it shares that we benefit off the exploitation of laborers
Kathryn Long
56:46
That we should connect immigration with money.
Elizabeth Studstill
56:46
Immigrants only work certain "undersirable" jobs. immigrant labor is always unskilled.
Dani Scherer
56:49
Underlying: That immigrants can only be valued based on their economic contribution
grayla reneau
57:01
Immigrants are devalued in each example.
keri marion
57:05
the bigger question is why won't we pay the value?
Jessica Handrik
57:12
who is "our"?
Andy Nash
57:15
What matters is how useful immigrants are to “us.”
Jessica Levy
57:16
++
Jessica Levy
57:21
Who is our?
Moira Taylor
57:38
Yes, our.
Beverly Keim
57:43
WOW, Jessica: GOOD QUESTION
Elizabeth Studstill
57:43
the important thing about immigrants is how "we" do or don't benefit. it's nothing to do with immigrants themselves or what they want.
Mark Trushkowsky
58:22
Adult education is also often only talked about in terms of what it can or can’t do for the economy.
Shana Friend
58:25
I am an invisible (white) immigrant and often get told "Oh, but you're not a real immigrant." Yes I am. I am from Canada.
Kathryn Long
58:36
At what point do "immigrants" become part of us? Aren't they part of who "we" are?
Jessica Levy
58:42
Yes, @ Mark! That bothers me a lot.
Heather Patterson
01:03:41
I'm an immigrant but a native English speaker and white. Most Americans don't view me as an immigrant and I've heard many anti-immigrant remarks. When I point out I am also an immigrant I hear things like "oh, but you're not that kind of immigrant".
Shana Friend
01:04:11
@Heather. Same
Janet Isserlis
01:04:45
@Heather and @Shana - another instance of implicit bias and visible/invisible ‘differences’
Eleanor Mair
01:05:03
@Heather Me too!
Elke Stappert
01:05:37
Also helpful to address bias students from different cultures may have towards each other
Sally Waldron
01:05:51
Having student ambassadors and having students serve on hiring committees.
Debra Solomon
01:06:05
At the college where I teach ELL we now have a student gov rep on our Bd of Trustees and also one of my former ELL students is a full member of the Bd of Trustees: Gateway Technical College in WI
Jessica Levy
01:06:16
We don’t invite student voice. I do evaluations in my class; but I don’t think they get looked at.
Shana Friend
01:06:17
I have an ex-student who volunteers to help new students at our college. She is constantly advocating for adult students with the college president and board.
Janet Isserlis
01:10:12
health care providers typically rely on women of color to do the hardest physical work in care facilities; and they are generally poorly paid and ill-treated
Elke Stappert
01:10:13
The gray box is blocking the right part of the presentation again
Sally Waldron
01:10:26
In the pandemic, most of the people in "essential jobs", people who had to go to work, couldn't work from home, were persons of color.
Kathryn Long
01:10:34
In our department, the BIPOC members are support staff. All of our instructors in ESOL are white.
Jessica Levy
01:12:02
Kathryn, same - all our ESOL instructors - and administrators - are white.
Mark Trushkowsky
01:12:24
If other folks are comfortable with it, we can change the chat setting so your comments are visible to both the Panelists and the other attendees. I feel like I’m missing so many important ideas!
Moira Taylor
01:12:27
BIPOC people often have language barriers that prevent them from doing jobs in the U.S. that are more at their education level.
Shana Friend
01:12:46
Our faculty of color get called on to do all the equity work. (For no extra pay)
Stacie Evans
01:13:22
@Shana Yes!
Gwen Moore
01:13:52
Nonprofit partners in my community are primarily based in white churches. I imagine many people aren't comfortable in those spaces, prospective staff and clients alike.
Claudia McCormack
01:13:59
We need to recruit our students to become adult ed teachers
Judy Vanhoy
01:14:01
oops!
Elke Stappert
01:14:11
Bias towards non-native English teachers
Marilyn Morton
01:14:12
A bias among teachers — that if you do not have a doctorate’s than you cannot contribute academically!
Rachel Mehl
01:14:13
Shana Friend so true!!
Kathleen O'Connell
01:14:13
Customer facing staff tend to be whiter than those tending to the oftentimes more physical, difficult work.
Claudia McCormack
01:14:13
It is such a loss that so many people never get to know any immigrants. When funders have visited my classes they have been amazed and I always wonder what exactly were they expecting?!
Leah Havas
01:14:21
Fortunately, one of the institutions I work for has many teachers Spanish speakers and people of color
Linda Blakesley
01:14:23
@Shana that's not right, maybe you can propose that your white colleagues begin to do the personal work. Start with a book club or something. It is our work. And we should do it for free.
Mark Trushkowsky
01:14:47
Yes! I 100% agree with you Claudia. But then I remember the financial realities of our field, that make it so unviable for so many of our students to enter it.
Elizabeth Studstill
01:14:48
so many programs are "staffed" by volunteers. who can usually afford to give their time for free...? white retirees. learners often don't see themselves represented in their teachers.
Philip Anderson
01:14:52
I had a job as a legal assistant with a group of migrant labor lawyers, it always struck me that the final decisions in labor cases had the farmworkers as the plaintiffs but the lawyers, all white, and the judges, all white, and the growers, all white, made the final decisions using legal language. I really had (still have) a savior complex during that time!
Linda Blakesley
01:15:19
Middle Skill jobs
keri marion
01:15:45
the fastest growing might not require more credential, but the top-paying often do.
Kathryn Long
01:16:25
Yes! Starting at 2, and increasing by 50%, is 3. Thanks for saying that!
Leah Havas
01:16:36
Phillip Anderson, problem is that toucan’t be a lawyer if you are an immigrant, even if you’re a lawyer in your country.
keri marion
01:16:46
exactly
Leah Havas
01:17:23
Immigrants will always be defended by white, native people, unless you are able to get a person of color who is a lawyer.
Mark Trushkowsky
01:17:25
Thank you for making this point. This is such an important point to make about our field.
Philip Anderson
01:17:33
@Leah, thank you for pointing that out.
Regina Johnson
01:18:43
even with credentials, people of color often aren't given the opportunities
Dawn Hannah
01:18:43
Seems the need is to change pay structures. Home health aides and other essential workers need to be paid more!!!
Tessa Peixoto
01:19:07
need to take the bias out of these pay decisions.
Kathryn Long
01:19:22
I am feeling gratitude for all of this information, and cringing, at the same time.
renee regna
01:20:01
Wage difference disparity- work experience and time taken off for child rearing also need to be considered
Claudia McCormack
01:20:01
WHY? Cuz white people got a running start based on years of free labor!
Elizabeth Studstill
01:20:14
it's all about that generational wealth
Elke Stappert
01:20:15
@ Kathryn: yes, both!
Lori Carswell
01:20:36
Both. Inability of generations of Black people to build wealth via homeownership
Lori Carswell
01:20:49
Because of housing discrimination etc
Beverly Keim
01:21:16
"Etc" including who could get *mortgages*
Lori Carswell
01:21:23
Yes
Jessica Levy
01:21:50
WIOA
Mark Trushkowsky
01:21:58
There is such funding pressure to “prepare students for work” as the rationale for our funding. But what kinds of jobs are available to them?
Susan Keller
01:22:03
What are the real hopes of our students?
Janet Isserlis
01:22:03
as @Lori said - the differences between wealth and income.
Jessica Levy
01:22:11
Funding pressure - as Mark says
Kathryn Long
01:22:25
My textbook, the materials I develop, the speakers that I invite into my classroom, etc.
Moira Taylor
01:22:26
We are advising students about careers/jobs. Are we advising them based on our own ideas and biases?
Tameka Patterson
01:22:40
We have to pay attention to this. It is essential to delivery of pedagogy and ensuring learners are fully equipped with information and advocacy skills
Susan Keller
01:22:41
Capitalist work has a dehumanizing element that needs to be faced. You are replaceable.
Lori Carswell
01:22:44
I teach financial literacy and try to incorporate this type of info more and more
Leah Havas
01:22:44
most of our students have lower paid jobs
Elizabeth Studstill
01:22:55
we have to know the realities in order to advocate for change
Rachel Mehl
01:22:56
Funding streams have a narrative that the immigrant student must be “fixed” or “improved” to be successful in the US economy. It doesn’t acknowledge the systemic racism students face. How can we dismantle systemic racism in adult education work?
Janet Isserlis
01:23:09
yes @Rachel.
Johannah Malone
01:23:23
Specially the immigrant that is a new country
Mark Trushkowsky
01:23:25
Wow to Moira’s question.
Beverly Keim
01:23:28
Very much yes @Rachel
Jessica Levy
01:23:46
I taught an HHA-ESL class and then realized that HHAs don’t even make a living wage. That felt pretty bad - except that some of the students went on into a CNA program… Also: as ppl have noted, so many immigrants can’t get jobs in their fields. We’re losing out on all that talent and skill.
Claudia McCormack
01:23:48
We have to present things with a strategy to process the information - along side of successes like restaurant worker winning lost wages in court for ex so they see a way out not just atrocities and anger.
Susan Keller
01:23:51
Fix the economic system. Humanize it. More time off. More job sharing. Etc. Childcare.
Leah Havas
01:24:26
We are advising them according to how much English they can speak. unfortunately
keri marion
01:24:31
picking yourself up from bootstraps requires you first have boots.
Lori Carswell
01:24:43
@Keri exactly!!
Moira Taylor
01:24:51
Yes @leah
Regina Johnson
01:24:52
Thanks for your honesty
Jessica Levy
01:24:57
Also, our “outcomes” that we’re supposed to track relate to whether a person gets a job or gets a “better” job - but not about whether it’s a living wage job, or what the working conditions are like, etc.
Claudia McCormack
01:25:10
And Operation Bootstrap ravaged Puerto Rico!
Johannah Malone
01:25:13
No
Kathryn Long
01:25:17
And the discomfort I feel in hearing this is not the same as the pain that my students experience every day. I shouldn't avoid participating in these conversations. I have found that when I talk about systemic racism with my students, they feel more empowered.
Elizabeth Studstill
01:25:21
advising for work/career are also means learning about Workers Rights and how to unionize, advocate, fight for better conditions
Hillary Bradburn
01:25:29
Agreed, Kathryn!
keri marion
01:25:34
It's not fair, no, but we have to recognize that we are allowing that explotiation with our 1.99/lb asparagus
keri marion
01:25:43
and the $5 Walmart t-shirts
Janet Isserlis
01:26:03
also thinking of how we share responsibilities in our own workplaces; moving from symbolic action to re-envisioning work
Leah Havas
01:26:18
Well said @ Keri
Gina Pandolfo
01:27:09
Also, many adult learners have already had extensive jobs and careers. How are Adult Ed programs supporting participants to utilize the skills and knowledge and priorities they already have
Judy Vanhoy
01:27:26
Gina: Yes, yes, yes!
Leah Havas
01:28:26
Exactly Gina, I have a student who was a big lawyer in her country, working as a cook...
Kathryn Long
01:28:28
Getting students ready for jobs and careers may mean giving them a place where they can talk about the challenges they face when they apply for jobs - the assumptions that are made about what they can do. Our students need to hear that recognize the injustices they face.
Philip Anderson
01:28:39
Childcare workers, even in federally funded programs earn barely above minimum wage $8-9 per hour in Florida. Even if they were to fight to make them better jobs, the wage is so far down. These wages exist even in childcare programs where the wealthy send their children.
Rachel Mehl
01:28:42
Thank you Cynthia! Your words are so inspiring.
Mark Trushkowsky
01:28:43
I’m wondering about calling students, English-language learners as opposed to something like multi-language learners. Not only is it a deficit model, but it also feels like it is misinterpreting their strengths and gifts, from many perspectives, including an economic one. It’s amazing to me how many language so many students speak, compared to me.
Amy Russell
01:28:44
Unfortunately, the program I work in does not really help students leverage the skills and education they come in with. The curriculum we deliver is basic level and too general to be very effective for job preparation.
Lisa Morse
01:28:53
So, we need to be Teaching to Transgress, right?
Leah Havas
01:29:04
Correct @ Ay Russel
Lynn LeClaire
01:29:33
Hi Lea Havas!
keri marion
01:29:42
lol, these are all useless.
Shana Friend
01:29:47
Assumes they are making a middle class wage
Judy Vanhoy
01:29:51
Yeah, I would skip all that BS.
Pesha Black
01:29:52
You can't "manage" your way out of poverty!
Lisa Morse
01:29:54
we have money to save!
Leah Havas
01:30:08
HI Lynn LeClaire!
Lori Carswell
01:30:08
Yes I teach Fin Lit and these are bad... but fortunately there are now some better resources out there too
Staci Van Art
01:30:09
Assuming they will ever be able to retire or save money.
keri marion
01:30:09
because it doesn't address how their resources, evaluate the resources they have or don't have
Amy Russell
01:30:16
Yes! @Pesha
Dingding Jia
01:30:16
They all assume that the students are the problems
Mark Trushkowsky
01:30:18
Exactly! Implicit in this is that poverty is caused by people in poverty.
Andrea Fine
01:30:21
assumptions about tech skills (google spreadsheet)
Marilyn Morton
01:30:22
It is all based on assumptions!
Gina Pandolfo
01:30:25
Some programs assume that people choose to be poor
Elizabeth Studstill
01:30:26
it's like telling people to skip their coffee when they're hundreds of thousands in debt lol. this $5 per week purchas eis not the problem
Jessica Levy
01:30:32
IT’s all up to you!
keri marion
01:30:33
sorry, I kind of lost my thought anyway, but the point is it doesn't address their position in the first place
Judy Vanhoy
01:30:40
If you’re broke, it’s your fault.
keri marion
01:30:48
what if college isn't the right thing for them?
Gina Pandolfo
01:30:49
Rather than addressing systemic issues that put and keep people in poverty
Leah Havas
01:30:58
Assumptions that immigrants don’t understand finances…some of them have higher college degrees than ourselves.
Lori Carswell
01:31:01
NGPF is getting better about this, recently introduced material on systemic racism in finance and housing
Xavier Munoz
01:31:06
@Mark, in the work of academics and in K-12, I've seen a change in terms moving away from the deficit-based "ELL" toward alternatives like "multicompetent", "multilingual learner", "emergent bilingual", "translingual", etc.
keri marion
01:31:08
that you have enough money to manage
Virginia Dugan
01:31:12
NextGen Personal Finance has a great session on racism in finance
Brenda Anfinson
01:31:17
they are making themselves poor with their bad decision-making
Gina Pandolfo
01:31:20
Some programs assume that people choose to be poor, Rather than addressing systemic issues that put and keep people in poverty
Kathryn Long
01:31:22
also, that it's good to save and have money in the first place
Lori Carswell
01:31:22
Yes @Ginny haha
keri marion
01:31:22
and that you even have an opportunity to retire
Mark Trushkowsky
01:31:23
That you can “manage” your way out of poverty.
Moira Taylor
01:31:26
There is only one way to think about money management.
Lori Carswell
01:31:30
Next Gen Persona Finance
Lori Carswell
01:31:32
Personal
Dolores Del Giorgio
01:31:33
It assumes you're making enough money to save for college and create a retirement account, etc.
Jayme Adelson-Goldstein
01:31:33
Next generation Personal finance
keri marion
01:31:33
yes, moira!
Virginia Dugan
01:31:34
Next Generation Personal Finance
Joy Gaine
01:31:35
First one (tips) useful and important to teach, no?
Lori Carswell
01:31:36
We use it at VAL
Kirsten Collins
01:31:49
Stephen Colbert did a "report" about this, focusing on the McDonalds employee budgeting handbook is based on the assumption that low-income folks can't manage their money(even though the average wage they were paid made a budget impossible)..
Gina Pandolfo
01:31:52
Assumes people are choosing to be poor, Rather than addressing systemic issues that put and keep people in poverty
Andrea Fine
01:31:56
assumptions that their money problems are caused by something they are doing
Jayme Adelson-Goldstein
01:31:58
Assumes that learners don’t have financial literacy
Kathryn Long
01:32:09
it assumes that all cultures talk about money and saving money
Leah Havas
01:32:11
Assuming most people are ppor
Mark Trushkowsky
01:32:11
Thanks@Xavier!
Jessica Levy
01:32:18
that people don’t have money because they’re not managing it right
Marilyn Morton
01:32:19
Great Gina Pandolfo!!!
Dolores Del Giorgio
01:32:20
Assumes we choose our income level
Kirsten Collins
01:32:20
Assumes that poverty is a choice based on poor decisions
keri marion
01:32:23
these aren't necessarily useless, but they're not necessarily a first-level assessment and not talking about what kinds of priorities need to be addressed, nor does it develop a skill set with real strategies
Krystina Janus
01:32:34
Money is only one kind of resource. Focusing on money is a narrow focus. A more wholistic view of one's resources should be considered.
Claudia McCormack
01:32:49
May also be based on a nuclear family.
Burgen Young
01:33:06
What do the students mean by “money problems?”
keri marion
01:33:24
totally, Burgen…
Leah Havas
01:33:25
Good question @Burgen
keri marion
01:33:40
and that sometimes people have been sold an idea that they need to live some kind of suburban ideal
Dolores Del Giorgio
01:33:40
Yes! @Claudia. So much depends of your financial situation depends also on your social network.
Jayme Adelson-Goldstein
01:33:41
@Burgen exactly— we go to tell before we ask
Judy Vanhoy
01:33:47
So, if you’re oppressed by medical debt, then that’s because you were not “literate” in terms of finances.
Debbie Goldman
01:34:01
and the boat is full of money
Moira Taylor
01:34:03
yes@Burgen
Leah Havas
01:34:06
The American Dream!
keri marion
01:34:13
lol Debbie... a big bag of money!
Kathryn Long
01:34:16
@ Debbie - yes
keri marion
01:34:43
yes!
Pesha Black
01:34:57
I think there's something about the term "literacy", too -- we mostly don't talk about improving the literacy skills, in any area, of professionals, even though we are expanding our literacy skills in a variety of genres! Instead we talk about things like professional growth, planning, becoming data-informed, etc.
Krystina Janus
01:35:20
Help learners understand environmental influences that affect their purchasing attitudes and behaviors and help them to become more thoughtful about the choices they make
Amy Russell
01:35:47
What, precisely does it mean to make “bad jobs better?”
Jessica Levy
01:35:50
That’s so true, Pesha! It’s “financial planning"!
Gwen Moore
01:36:38
Education organizations can set a good example through pay transparency within the organization. Transparency promotes equity.
Susan Keller
01:36:53
Paid sick time and increased minimum wage are two ways to make jobs better. Also dignity and good treatment within jobs.
Elizabeth Studstill
01:36:57
@Amy - workers rights. do you get PTO? do you get sick days? are there anti-discrimination laws on the books in your state? etc
Joy Gaine
01:37:09
Affordable (free?) childcare
Leah Havas
01:37:25
You are lucky if you get all these benefits.
Elizabeth Studstill
01:38:10
understanding what laws protect undocumented workers (usually more than they think) and what the risk/reward is in challenging an employer so learners can make an informed decision about whether they want to push for something or not
Leah Havas
01:38:41
@ Elizabeth correct. Thank you for pointing that out
Amy Russell
01:39:08
Thanks @Elizabeth
Eric Appleton
01:39:51
I love the Miami/Boston union housekeeper graphic. Source please!
Rachel Mehl
01:40:02
Yes, this is such a great graphic
Moira Taylor
01:40:02
Wow! What a difference.
Stacie Evans
01:40:09
That's a powerful stat!
Lynn LeClaire
01:40:34
Unions provide workers with a say in their workplace destiny.
keri marion
01:40:59
what is the wage, though? because non-union in Boston would not be 21.45...I don't doubt it's higher, but it would be interesting to know
keri marion
01:41:17
(higher than 9.50, I mean)
Claudia McCormack
01:41:19
So true! In college I worked PT at Macy's in New Haven and got good health coverage because in NY the workers had a union!
Moira Taylor
01:41:35
@Wow Claudia
Leah Havas
01:41:38
Do we really think that talking about this subject will help the bias racism? How?
keri marion
01:41:52
I just heard about this.. it was for an Amazon fulfillment center, right?
Susan Keller
01:41:54
Empower BIPOC
Leah Havas
01:42:06
What is BOPOC?
Beverly Keim
01:42:11
Yes, @Susan: empowerment.
Claudia McCormack
01:42:12
Because it empowers people from the ground up.
Leah Havas
01:42:16
sorry BIPOC
Susan Keller
01:42:16
Black Indigenous and People of Color
Eric Appleton
01:42:19
Source of union housekeeper graphic --> https://unitehere.org/changed-lives/
keri marion
01:42:31
or that Bezos could just close the center and open one elsewhere
keri marion
01:42:39
thank you, Eric
Rachel Mehl
01:42:42
YES!
Mark Trushkowsky
01:42:47
BIPOC stands for Black Indigenous People of Color
Lynn LeClaire
01:43:52
Unions can help people of all races etc. get better pay, benefits, etc. Again, having that knowledge that you have a say in what happens at your workplace is so valuable. And usually unions have grievance and arbitration provisions in the contracts, which protects workers.
Beverly Keim
01:44:43
Employers with unions can also not give different answers, depending on the race, gender, etc of the comer...
Karen Sanchez
01:44:51
@Leah: If we can promote systemic change, then the "water we swim in" with such financial disparities might change, so when ALL people are truly empowered to earn a higher wager, social ideas about others might change
Lynn LeClaire
01:44:59
what I said above is an answer to that.
Susan Keller
01:45:36
Knowledge is power. Students must be the drivers of their destiny and have access to all tools that might make their future have more possibilities.
keri marion
01:46:02
communities can protest until it changes
keri marion
01:46:20
because there is strength in numbers
Kathryn Long
01:46:21
In our local, we are starting to have discussions about equity. At first, our administrators thought that we just wanted to change pronouns in our contract (he/she --> they). We are now working on other elements. In fact, we are talking about how to have better representation - not just white folks being the face and voice of the union. We can live the example for our students if we are members of a union.
Robbin Golden
01:46:22
Union contracts mean equal treatment, pay
Rachel Mehl
01:46:26
The fact that promoting individual budgeting is seen as “neutral” in adult ed classrooms, while teaching about the history of the labor movement and promoting access to union jobs is considered “biased” in adult ed, is a symptom of the systemic racism and classism we live within.
Leah Havas
01:46:42
Thank you!
Jessica Levy
01:46:42
Yeah, Rachel. Thanks for saying that.
keri marion
01:47:28
I think RI is one, but I forget
Mark Trushkowsky
01:47:37
A book that made a huge impression on me when I first started teaching in adult education was A Long Haul. It is the autobiography of Myles Horton and the story of the Highlander Folk School, which is an important history on the confluence of adult education, community organizing, racial justice, and the labor movement.
keri marion
01:48:06
We shouldn't be bringing anything in to ask people to support or not. We just provide the information as best we can and initiate conversation
keri marion
01:48:12
and actionable steps
Silja Kallenbach
01:48:24
earning a higher wage enables you to accumulate wealth which enables you to for example save to buy assets like a house that generates equity that your children benefit from. This counters the long-standing racist practice of denying BIPOC people access to loans/ mortgages through red-lining, suppressed wages etc. It doesn't do away with racism but it can increase economic equity.
Joe Przyperhart
01:48:28
one can look at the impact of "right to work" laws on wages in states that have adopted these laws
Lynn LeClaire
01:49:02
There are protections now, but they've been whittled away. Some people think that the right to organize should be a right, like Bill of Rights quality.
Virginia Dugan
01:50:09
Great food for thought
Hillary Bradburn
01:50:31
Thank you so much for this, Cynthia et al.
Elke Stappert
01:50:41
This webinar has been REALLY great, informative and thought-provoking. However, the pace was so fast, can you build in some time for discussion next time? (at least time to read the many great chat comments?) or even add a workshop so there's more time to space things out a bit?
Jessica Levy
01:50:50
Thank you so much, Cynthia!
Alice-Ann Beachy
01:50:53
Thank you, this has been amazing!!
Linda Blakesley
01:50:55
Loved the dialogue. Very rich.
Hillary Bradburn
01:51:00
Also wondering if we will have access to this webinar to review.
Lori Carswell
01:51:04
Great session, thank you!!
Dingding Jia
01:51:06
Thank you so much! Very informative!
Staci Van Art
01:51:07
This is important work. Thank you so much for sharing with us.
Dolores Del Giorgio
01:51:08
Thank you!
Sandra Dunlap
01:51:08
Thank you!
Rachel Mehl
01:51:09
Thank you so much Cynthia! This space is so important for us as adult educators. Thank you.
Janet Isserlis
01:51:09
Thank you
Susan Keller
01:51:12
Great presentation! Lots of action steps!
Elke Stappert
01:51:16
Can you remove the chat box so we can see the email address?
Lynn LeClaire
01:51:18
Thank you!
Maegan Morris
01:51:20
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1mnsTxTZc3rHo9K1kik49ghnBx3s7HW4trtiXGBoqRUY/edit?pli=1
Heather Patterson
01:51:26
This was wonderful. Thank you, Cynthia!
Eric Appleton
01:51:29
Thank you for the webinar, and thank you for making it available to everyone in the field across the country.
Andy Nash
01:51:30
cynthia_peters@worlded.org
Maegan Morris
01:51:32
April 13 – Implicit BiasApril 20 – Classroom Materials and Practices (with Riva Pearson)April 27 – Programs and the Field (with Carmine Stewart)Remember: Check out this interactive space where we have collected some best practices, and where you can share your own experience. https://docs.google.com/document/d/1mnsTxTZc3rHo9K1kik49ghnBx3s7HW4trtiXGBoqRUY/edit?pli=1Questions/comments? Contact me at Cynthia Peters, cynthia_peters@worlded.org
Stacie Evans
01:51:32
Thank you, Cynthia! (And hi Silja!)
Rosemary Haenn
01:51:34
Thank you so much for your time and attention to this incredibly important topic!
Jessica Levy
01:51:34
Can we get a list of participants? I’d love to know who’s attending that’s in my area (Philly)!
Krystina Janus
01:51:35
Lots of great information and superbly presented! Thank you :-)
Leah Havas
01:51:44
Good presentation and very helpful. Maybe we could have more interaction, somehow.
Johannah Malone
01:51:45
Thank you very mach.
Judy Vanhoy
01:51:49
Will the links be emailed?
Maegan Morris
01:51:52
Lesson Packet 10 – “Taking Action at Work” – a collection of mostly first person stories of students speaking up at work for better conditions, and wages, etc.https://changeagent.nelrc.org/in-the-classroom/lesson-packets/#packet10Lesson Packet 17 – “Indigenous People’s Issue (Level 4 Adaptations)” – a 13-page collection of 5 articles by and about indigenous peoples.https://changeagent.nelrc.org/in-the-classroom/lesson-packets/#packet17“Talking about Race” – this issue of The Change Agent is free this year. Go to https://changeagent.nelrc.org/, fill out the form, and receive a PDF of the magazine, all the audio, and all the extras!
Heidi Schuler-Jones
01:52:00
This has been wonderful. Thank you so much, Cynthia!
Leah Havas
01:52:32
Can we have the links in the chat please?
Janet Isserlis
01:52:39
could we paste these links into the google doc, please?
Leah Havas
01:52:52
or send it to the participants.
Virginia Dugan
01:53:03
thank you!
Leah Havas
01:53:09
Thank you!
Eric Appleton
01:53:27
+1 to Janet's suggestion: Could all lesson links and resources be added to the Google Doc?
Moira Taylor
01:53:33
Thank you Cynthia!
Elke Stappert
01:53:34
This webinar has been REALLY great, informative and thought-provoking. However, the pace was so fast, can you build in some time for discussion next time? (at least time to read the many great chat comments?) or even add a workshop so there's more time to space things out a bit?  THANK YOU
Tessa Peixoto
01:53:42
courage
Debbie Goldman
01:53:42
implicit bias
keri marion
01:53:46
yes, agreed w/ Janet & Eric
Lisa Morse
01:53:46
Hope
Beverly Keim
01:53:47
https://changeagent.nelrc.org/issues/
Philip Anderson
01:53:50
stronger feeling of peace
Susan Caisse
01:53:59
we are stronger together
Susan Keller
01:54:01
Empowerment
Krystina Janus
01:54:02
inspiration
Rachel Mehl
01:54:04
Renewed inspiration to do this work
Shana Friend
01:54:05
strategy
Claudia McCormack
01:54:06
ABE BACK ON TRACK!
Jayme Adelson-Goldstein
01:54:07
There is an active and engaged community of educators who want to make change
Andrea Fine
01:54:07
new considerations for career advising
Leah Havas
01:54:08
more information about how to go forward
Beverly Keim
01:54:12
Optimism (not outsized, but SOME)
Lynn LeClaire
01:54:14
Much food for thought. A feeling that all is not lost.
Heidi Schuler-Jones
01:54:14
Change is possible because it's within each one of us.
Jessica Levy
01:54:15
the language we use to talk about adult ed (“financial _literacy_”)
Kimberly Libby
01:54:19
adult ed collectively taking responsibility
Linda Blakesley
01:54:19
Awareness of how my students might feel about me when they see a white teacher.
Mark Trushkowsky
01:54:22
Buoyant \
Karen Sanchez
01:54:22
Lots of great discussion material to bring to our department meetings on these issues
Patricia DeFerrari
01:54:28
Listen
keri marion
01:54:29
thank you again! g'nite
Moira Taylor
01:54:31
a way to talk more about work and the biases in it for my students - encourage them but also make them even more aware.
Patricia DeFerrari
01:54:34
Thank you!
Dolores Del Giorgio
01:54:40
Thoughts about creating an anti-bias template for our program : )
Kimberly Libby
01:54:43
thank you so much <3
Amy Thompson
01:54:45
A more beautiful world is possible. . .
Susan Caisse
01:54:47
Will you send out the chat too?
Kirsten Collins
01:54:51
Thank you!
Pesha Black
01:54:51
Thanks everyone!
Amy Thompson
01:54:52
Thank you
Mark Trushkowsky
01:54:57
Thank you so much to all the panelists and attendees!